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October Is National Physical Therapy Month!
20SepNo Comments
October Is National Physical Therapy Month!
Orofino Physical Therapy September 20, 2017 No Comments

October Is National Physical Therapy Month!

Recognizing Concussions in Student-Athletes

 

A concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury caused by a direct blow to the head, face, or neck. In the United States, an estimated 300,000 sports-related concussions occur annually.
In high school gender-comparable sports, girls have a higher concussion rate than boys. Female athletes have also been shown to have a greater recovery time in post-concussion symptoms as compared to males.
Signs of a Concussion

 

Concussion symptoms usually appear within minutes of the injury; however, some symptoms may take several hours to occur. Any athlete who has lost consciousness during a sports-related impact should be examined for a concussion or a spine injury. A headache is the most common complaint of an athlete with a concussion. If you suspect your child has suffered a concussion, they may exhibit the following symptoms, which may worsen with stress or activity:
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Headache
  • Feeling in a “fog”
  • Difficulty remembering
  • Behavioral changes (irritability, rapid changes in mood, exaggerated emotions, aggressiveness, depression, decreased tolerance to stress, etc)
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Difficulty with balance
  • Pupils that are enlarged or not equal in size
  • Double or blurred visionSlurred speech
  • Difficulty falling asleep
  • Excessive drowsiness

 

What to do if you suspect a concussion in an athlete:

 

Do not allow them to return to any sporting event.
The athlete should be allowed to rest until there is a resolution of symptoms. This allows the brain to recover. Rest involves allowing time to sleep or take frequent naps. Minimizing distractions, such as television, Internet, reading, or phone use is important.
It is unnecessary to wake the athlete up every hour. This disturbs sleep patterns, which can interfere with the healing process of the brain.
The athlete should avoid pain relievers, like aspirin or other anti-inflammatory medications. These may increase the risk of bleeding in the brain.
The athlete should not be left alone following the injury. Symptoms should be monitored closely. If they worsen, the athlete may need to be evaluated in the emergency room to determine if a more serious brain injury exists.

 

TO FIND OUT MORE VISIT http://www.apta.org/

 

References
McCrory P, Meeuwisse WH, Aubry M, et al. Consensus statement on concussion in sport: the 4th international conference on concussion in sport held in Zurich, November 2012. Br J Sports Med. 2013;47:250–258. Free Article. |  Covassin T, Schatz P, Swanik CB. Sex differences in neuropsychological function and post-concussion symptoms of concussed collegiate athletes. Neurosurgery. 2007;61(2):345–351. Article Summary on PubMed. | Gessel LM, Fields SK, Collins CL, Dick RW, Comstock RD. Concussions among United States high school and collegiate athletes. J Athl Train. 2007;42(4):495–503. Free Article. | Broshek DK, Kaushik T, Freeman JR, Erlanger D, Webbe F, Barth JT. Sex differences in outcome following sports-related concussion. J Neurosurg. 2005;102(5):856–863. Article Summary on PubMed. | Farace E, Alves WM. Do women fare worse: a meta-analysis of gender differences in traumatic brain injury outcome. J Neurosurg. 2000;93(4):539–545. Article Summary on PubMed.
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